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Antal publikationer: 31 st
  • Rapport

    Equines in the Nordics

    With roots as far as the Bronze age, equines have played an invaluable role in history, both with regards to agriculture and forestry, warfare, transportation and leisure, and therefore hold important cultural significance in the Nordics. The link between horses and the welfare benefits of their caregivers makes the species an important part of society as well. Since the agricultural and industrial revolution, the equine sector has been influenced by a range of challenges due to the dramatic change in the role of horses in society, especially for the Nordic native breeds. However, as society adapts and finds new ways to use and protect them, there is a hope for the future.

    Although there has been cooperation between the Nordic countries in the horse sector, a collective report of the status of all the Nordic countries has been missing. This report marks a start for this type of effort by considering both commercial and native breeds. Further, it comprises the horse sector in the Nordics, with a special focus on the native horse breeds and the possibilities they carry for environmental sustainability, their socio-economic importance, their genetics as well as their risk status.

    The report further evaluates the Domestic Animal Diversity Information System (DAD-IS) maintained and developed by FAO as a tool for gathering information about the development and current status of the native breeds. The goal of this report is to identify knowledge gaps and areas of improvement for the Nordic equine sector and the collected data of the native horse breeds.

    One of the biggest challenges has been to find validated information sources for the population numbers of the breeds in each country – there are varying estimates for both commercial and native breeds. The numbers have significant impact for the determination of managing strategies of the populations. Reports for each of the countries (Denmark, Finland, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) are presented, and depict the current role of horses, breeding, population development and economic values of the equine sector are listed in each of the country-reports. The information in the country reports were derived from a questionnaire and by using DAD-IS.

    Equines in the Nordics
  • Ministerdeklaration

    Access and Rights to Genetic Resources 2023 The Kalmar II Declaration

    Genetic resources are genetic material of actual and potential value that may be important to humans and life on earth. A great variety of genetic resources is a prerequisite for natural selection, adaptation, and evolution. Access to the world’s genetic resources and a fair and equitable sharing of the benefits that arise from their use are therefore important matters that are regulated in several national and international forums.

    The Nordic countries have a long history of more than 50 years of collaboration within conservation and sustainable use of genetic resources.

    The technological and political advancements since the adoption of the Kalmar Declaration twenty years ago have made it evident that a new Nordic take is needed. The Nordic Council of Ministers Declaration on Access and Rights to Genetic Resources 2023 – The Kalmar II Declaration, address these changes.

    Access and Rights to Genetic Resources 2023 The Kalmar II Declaration
  • Årsrapport

    NordGen Annual Review 2023

    The Nordic Genetic Resource Centre (NordGen) is the Nordic countries’ gene bank and knowledge center for genetic resources. NordGen is an organisation under the Nordic Council of Minister and works with the mission of conserving and facilitating the sustainable use of genetic resources linked to food, agriculture and forestry.

    NordGen Annual Review 2023 provides a review of NordGen's work done in the past year.

    NordGen Annual Review 2023
  • Rapport

    NordGen PPP-report 2021-2023

    The Nordic Genetic Resource Center (NordGen) is the joint genebank and knowledge center for genetic resources in the Nordic countries. Our mission is to conserve and promote the sustainable use of genetic diversity among animals, forests and plants that are important for Nordic agriculture and forestry.

    NordGen PPP-report 2021-2023 provides a information about projects conducted within the framework of The Nordic Public-Private Partnership (PPP) for pre-breeding during the years 2021-2023.

    NordGen PPP-report 2021-2023
  • Rapport

    Seed Longevity and Survival of Seed Borne Diseases After 35 Years Conservation in Permafrost: – Report From the 100 Year Storage Experiment

    The Nordic Gene Bank (predecessor to today's plant section of The Nordic Genetic Resource Center, NordGen) established the 100 year seed storage experiment in Coal mine no. 3 outside Longyearbyen, Svalbard, in 1986. The experiment was established with the aim to monitor the longevity of seeds in this Nordic back-up seed collection that were deposited in the coal mine from 1984 and to gain general knowledge about the longevity of seed stored under permafrost conditions, as well as studying the survival of seed borne plant pathogens.

    Seed samples have regularly been withdrawn for analysis according to a fixed withdrawal and analyze plan, that will continue until the last samples are analyzed in 2086.

    Seed Longevity and Survival of Seed Borne Diseases After 35 Years Conservation in Permafrost: – Report From the 100 Year Storage Experiment
  • Rapport, Bevarandeplan

    Action Plan for the Conservation of the Faroese Horse

    Horses were brought to the Faroe Islands by Norse settlers in the 9th and 10th centuries. Over the centuries, the geographical remoteness in the North Atlantic Ocean forced these horses to adapt to their surroundings. Only the horses that could withstand the weather survived, and the Faroe Islands became home to a horse breed that was small, strong, hardy, and agile. The small horses were used by farmers for agricultural purposes and occasionally for transport between villages. Most of them roamed the mountains all year and no targeted breeding took place. The oldest record available of horses on the Faroe Islands is from 1857, which counted 844 horses with 396 mares, and 476 foals and stallions.

    Exportation of the horses to coal mines in Britain combined with modernization of the agriculture on the Faroe Islands, resulted in a breed that nearly went extinct. By the 1960s, there were less than ten horses of the breed left alive. A rescue operation was initiated, and suitable horses for breeding were used, however many of them were already related. All Faroese horses alive today, are descendants of only four individual horses.

    In 1978, the Faroese Horse Association (Felagið Føroysk Ross) was established to conserve the Faroese indigenous horse breed and they have kept a studbook ever since. In 2018, the online pedigree registration system Føroya Fongur was created, in which online access is provided to the studbook with extensive information about the Faroese horse breed.

    By the end of 2023 there were 82 living Faroese horses. The breed can thank their survival to the hard work and dedication from individual horse owners and enthusiast through the years, and through the work of the Faroese Horse Association. You could say that the conservation of the Faroese horse this far is a success story as the breed has managed to survive and increase in numbers over the years. However, there are still several big challenges and threats facing this small and hardy breed. There is a critical need to act today to secure that the breed will be around for future generations as well. The Faroese horse is, after all, a living and breathing part of the Faroese cultural heritage.

    All Nordic countries, including the Faroe Islands, have adopted The Global Plan of Action for Animal Genetic Resources (GPA) established by FAO in 2007. This framework obligates all parties to contribute to the conservation, sustainable use and development of animal genetic resources. One of the main areas of concern expressed in the GPA, is that there is too little research and information about many of the native farm animal breeds. Increased characterization, involving phenotypic, genetic, and historical information on breeds is needed (FAO, 2007).

    The purpose of the Action Plan for the Conservation of the Faroese Horse is to highlight concrete actions and measures that need be implemented to conserve the horse breed for the future.

    Action Plan for the Conservation of the Faroese Horse
  • Rapport

    Statistics: Forest Seeds and Plants in the Nordic Region – Version 2023

    The Nordic Genetic Resource Center (NordGen) is the joint genebank and knowledge center for genetic resources in the Nordic countries. Our mission is to conserve and promote the sustainable use of genetic diversity among animals, forests and plants that are important for Nordic agriculture and forestry.

    Statistics: Forest Seeds and Plants in the Nordic Region – Version 2023 is the second edition in a biennial statistics report on forest seed and plant material in the Nordic countries. The first edition was published in 2021. This edition has been expanded by including more statistics and more species than the first report, as well as including more recent data from the years 2020 and 2021. The report compiles statistics and reports contributed by representatives of each country in the NordGen Forest Regeneration Council.

    Statistics: Forest Seeds and Plants in the Nordic Region – Version 2023
  • Årsrapport

    NordGen Annual Review 2022

    NordGen Annual Review 2022 describes NordGen's activities and results during the year. Among other things, this was a year when we inaugurated our new head office, finalised a strategic period and launched, organised and participated in a wide range of activities, projects and events.

    NordGen Annual Review 2022
  • Rapport

    Access and Rights to Genetic Resources: A Nordic Approach (II)

    In 2003, the Nordic Council of Ministers issued the report “Access and Rights to Genetic Resources: A Nordic Approach”. Considering the international framework developed on access to genetic resources and benefit sharing from its use, the report and the ministerial follow-up, the Kalmar Declaration, provided a set of recommendations on how the Nordic countries and the Nordic Gene Bank should respond to this development regarding different types of genetic resources. Since then, several new and relevant international developments have occurred. This has created a need for renewed awareness and new recommendations on the Nordic approach to access and rights to genetic resources by the Nordic countries and The Nordic Genetic Resource Center (NordGen). In this updated report, several new issues are addressed such as for example the digitalization of genetic information and new international agreements like the Nagoya Protocol and the implementation of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture.

    Access and Rights to Genetic Resources: A Nordic Approach (II)
  • Vetenskaplig artikel

    Multi-location trials and population-based genotyping reveal high diversity and adaptation to breeding environments in a large collection of red clover.

    Nay MM, Grieder C, Frey LA, Amdahl H, Radovic J, Jaluvka L, Palmé A, Skøt L, Ruttink T, Kölliker R

  • Årsrapport

    NordGen Annual Review 2021

    The Nordic Genetic Resource Centre (NordGen) is the Nordic countries’ gene bank and knowledge center for genetic resources. NordGen is an organisation under the Nordic Council of Minister and works with the mission of conserving and facilitating the sustainable use of genetic resources linked to food, agriculture and forestry.

    NordGen Annual Review 2021 provides a review of NordGen’s work done in the past year.

    NordGen Annual Review 2021
  • Manual, Rapport

    Cultivation Manual: Medicinal and Aromatic Plants in the Nordic and Baltic Region

    The Nordic Genetic Resource Centre (NordGen) is the Nordic countries’ gene bank and knowledge center for genetic resources. NordGen is an organisation under the Nordic Council of Minister and works with the mission of conserving and facilitating the sustainable use of genetic resources linked to food, agriculture and forestry.
    ”Cultivation Manual: Medicinal and Aromatic Plants in the Nordic and Baltic Region” provides knowledge on cultivation of medicinal and aromatic plants.

    Cultivation Manual: Medicinal and Aromatic Plants in the Nordic and Baltic Region
  • Rapport

    Statistics: Forest Seeds and Plants in the Nordic Region

    The Nordic Genetic Resource Center (NordGen) is the joint genebank and knowledge center for genetic resources in the Nordic countries. Our mission is to conserve and promote the sustainable use of genetic diversity among animals, forests and plants that are important for Nordic agriculture and forestry.

    Statistics: Forest Seeds and Plants in the Nordic Region is a report with statistics on forest seeds and plant material in the Nordic countries. The report is primarily based on country reports (2013-2020), from the Nordic cooperation, through NordGen Forest Regeneration Council.

    Statistics: Forest Seeds and Plants in the Nordic Region
  • Rapport

    NordGen PPP-report 2018-2020

    In the Nordic countries some of the world’s northernmost agricultural areas are located. Agriculture and horticulture in the Nordic countries require a plant breeding which develops varieties adapted to the particular growing conditions of the high north in terms of a demanding climate. Over time, structural changes in the seed industry led to fewer Nordic breeding companies and as a consequence increased dependency on large multinational companies. In this context, the first steps were taken to strengthen the Nordic collaboration within plant breeding and the Public-Private Partnership (PPP) for PreBreeding was born. This folder compiles information about the four PPP-pre-breeding projects which have been active during the third period between 2018 to 2020 and what is expected to come in the future.

    NordGen PPP-report 2018-2020
  • Årsrapport

    NordGen Annual Review 2020

    NordGen Annual Review 2020 describes NordGen's operations during the year.

    NordGen Annual Review 2020
  • Årsrapport

    NordGen Annual Review 2019

    NordGen Annual Review 2019 describes NordGens operations during the year.

    NordGen Annual Review 2019
  • Rapport

    Genetic Conservation of Forest Trees in the Nordic countries

    The aim of this report is to highlight the status of forest gene conservation in the five Nordic countries, how the conservation of forest genetic resources is implemented, as well as strengths and challenges ahead.

    There is a need to further develop the European work at the Nordic and national level, including the development of more specific climatic zoning to assess the genetic diversity conserved. There is also a need for a systematic evaluation of how the so called Genetic conservation units (GCU) established under the European programme cover the species genetic diversity in the Nordic region. Evaluation, identification of conservation gaps, as well as characterisation of genetic variation captured by the GCU units, could be further developed in cooperation on a Nordic level.

    There is a question whether traditional in situ conservation efforts are enough to secure the genetic resources against future challenges, including climate change and pests and diseases. Cryo preservation and assisted migration have been mentioned as additional measures for some genetic resources at stake. The question on how to proceed and make the work as resilient as possible for the future, needs to be discussed at a Nordic and European scale.

    This document has been developed by the NordGen Forest Working Group on Genetic Resources, together with the secretariat of NordGen Forest .

    Genetic Conservation of Forest Trees in the Nordic countries
  • Rapport

    40 Years of Nordic Collaboration in Plant Genetic Resources

    The current book is a celebration of 40 years of Nordic collaboration on plant genetic resources. International perspectives are highlighted and the first chapter is written with input from Axel Diederichsen from Plant Gene Resources of Canada and Igor G. Loskutov from the N.I. Vavilov Institute of Plant Genetic Resources (VIR), and the chapter traces lines back to the pioneers and with a specific focus on Vavilov and how he had influenced scientists in the Nordic countries. Roland von Bothmer and Peter Tigerstedt give an overview of the Nordic plant breeding and genetic resources. Jens Weibull discusses the role of NGB (and NordGen) in the European genebank collaboration. A special section is given to a historical recap of how NGB worked with the Gatersleben gene bank in the early 1980s, at a time when computers were large and collaboration with GDR was not straight forward for western countries, and this section is written with inputs from Jan Engels (former Bioversity International) and Helmut Knüpffer (former IPK Gatersleben). The data management systems at NGB and NordGen are discussed by inputs from Dag Endresen (former IT leader at NGB, now at University of Oslo). We also have chapters on the collaboration with VIR and the Baltic States, the 100-years experiment on seed longevity in permafrost, and the Svalbard Global Seed Vault. Regarding the collections, Roland von Bothmer gives the story of the international Hordeum and Triticeae project and Udda Lundqvist of the Swedish Barley Mutant Collection. The celebration book is finished by chapters on the NordGen's Plant Genetic Resource Collection of today with perspectives on conservation and use, amongst others the ongoing Public-Private Partnership project, written by the current staff at the genebank and Anders Nilsson at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp. A special thanks to Helmut Knüpffer, Kit Lundborg, Roland von Bothmer and Sara Landqvist for their comments and proof-readings of this book.

    40 Years of Nordic Collaboration in Plant Genetic Resources
  • Rapport

    Seed Longevity and Survival of Seed Borne Diseases after 30 Year’s Conservation in Permafrost. Report from the 100 year storage experiment.

    The Nordic Gene bank established the 100 year seed storage experiment in Coal mine no. 3 outside Longyearbyen in 1986. Security duplicate samples of the Nordic seed collection had been deposited in permafrost in the coal mine since 1984.

    The experiment was established with the aim to monitor the longevity of seeds in this Nordic back-up seed collection and to gain general knowledge about the longevity of seed stored under permafrost conditions, as well as studying the survival of seed borne plant pathogens.

    The experimental set up included in total 41 seed lots of 17 agricultural and horticultural crop species commonly grown in the Nordic countries. The seed germination experiment included two or three varieties of each crop. The experimental part dedicated to studies of pathogen survival included seeds from 11 crops naturally contaminated by pathogens.

    The test program comprises germination and pathogen survival tests every 2.5 years during the first 20 years and then every 5 years for the last 80 years. In total 25 identical sets of test seeds placed in sealed glass tubes were packed in wooden boxes, one box for each planned test year.

    The tests have been carried out according to schedule and this report sums up the results from the first 30 years of the experiment. All tests have been carried out in accordance with the same ISTA-protocols.

    Seed Longevity and Survival of Seed Borne Diseases after 30 Year’s Conservation in Permafrost. Report from the 100 year storage experiment.
  • Rapport

    Nordic Agriculture and Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation

    This report summarizes the discussions and presentations at a workshop held in Oslo on January 18, 2019. The aim was to evaluate how future research can facilitate climate change adaptation and mitigation in Nordic agriculture. The workshop gathered leading actors within the field of Nordic plant breeding. Participants included high-level decision-makers and key stakeholders from Nordic plant breeding companies, farmer organisations, universities and other research organizations. Climate change has already resulted in challenges for Nordic agriculture and the difficulties will continue to increase in the future. It is therefore important to act now to adapt our agriculture to future conditions, especially since the development of new crop varieties takes a long time (8-15 years). In the following pages, specific recommendations are listed. The recommendations have the main goal to support future food security in the Nordic countries by facilitating the development of new crop varieties adapted to our future needs. Special attention is given to the challenge of adaptation to climate change and high-quality food and feed production.

    Nordic Agriculture and Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation
  • Årsrapport

    NordGen Annual Review 2018

    NordGen Annual Review describes NordGens operations during the year. In 2018, NordGen celebrated 10 years as a Nordic institution with joint responsibility for plant, farm animal and forest genetic resources. The year also included a multinational event in Svalbard, participation at the climate COP24 in Katowice, increased capacity in the greenhouse and fields and a review of NordGen's IT platform.

    NordGen Annual Review 2018
  • Broschyr

    Nordiskt samarbete om genetiska resurser: varför behövs det?

    NordGen är de nordiska ländernas gemensamma genbank och kunskapscenter för genetiska resurser. Denna broschyr samlar exempel på hur den nordiska frösamlingen kommer till nytta och varför det är så viktigt att bevara genetisk mångfald inom våra odlade växter, våra jordbruksdjur och i vår skog.

    Nordiskt samarbete om genetiska resurser: varför behövs det?
  • Bevarandeplan, Rapport

    Second Plan of Action for the Conservation of the Nordic Brown Bee

    The brown bee, Apis mellifera mellifera, is the honey bee subspecies that occurs natively in the Nordic region. In the 20th century, other honey bee subspecies were introduced to this region by beekeepers. Today, the native brown bee is endangered due to displacement and introgression by these other subspecies.The conservation of genetic diversity is imperative for maintaining future adaptive potential. Bees are not only important farm animals due to their honey production, but also due to their pollination services. Roughly a third of the world’s crop production is based on insect-pollinated plant species and honey bees represent an important pollinator. A priority list of recommended actions for the conservation of the brown bee in the Nordic region was compiled for the first time in 2015 and updated in this second version in 2019.

    Second Plan of Action for the Conservation of the Nordic Brown Bee
  • Rapport, Bevarandeplan

    Faroese Horse: Population status & conservation possibilities

    The Faroese horse (Føroysk Ross) is an integral part of agricultural history on the Faroe Islands. There is no unambiguous evidence of the origins of the Faroese Horse. It is believed, though, that the Faroese horse was brought to the islands by Celtic or/and Scandinavian settlers approximately 500-800 AD. Molecular genetic studies have indicated the closest genetic relationship with the Icelandic horse. Influences from Dartmoor and Exmoor ponies are also likely. Traditionally Faroese horses were kept free ranging in the mountains, and only gathered and brought to the villages when there was a need for transporting heavy goods. After f inishing their duties, the horses were again turned out without supplemental feeding. This semi-domestic management contributed to the Faroese horse developing into a small, strong and feed efficient horse with a compact body and strong legs and hoofs, well adapted to the climate, terrain and vegetation. The population size of the Faroese horse was likely 600 to 800 individuals at its highest. Mechanisation of agriculture and heavy exportation of Faroese Horses to the British Isles as mining ponies resulted in a drastic decrease in population size. Currently a small population of Faroese horse exists on the Faroese Islands, which stems from a few horses born between the 1940s and 1960s. Today, the Faroese horse is used for recreational purposes. The objective of this study was to conduct a pedigree analysis of the current population of the Faroese horse, as well as to describe the possibilities for a sustainable management of the breed by using optimal contribution selection (OCS).

    Faroese Horse: Population status & conservation possibilities
  • Rapport

    Promoting Nordic Plant Breeding for the Future PPP Public Private Partnership for Pre-breeding

    The establishment of PPP for Pre-breeding, development, present status and the way forward are described in this booklet. The success of the PPP is based on:

    • Pooled public funding

    • Participation from plant breeding companies

    • Engagement from research environments

    • 50/50-funding between public sources and industry

    The history of PPP for Pre-breeding has been a success and this booklet reveals some cases from the fruitful collaborations. The Nordic Council of Ministers is proud to have initiated the PPP for Pre-breeding and we are grateful to the partners, who have contributed to the process: plant breeding companies, universities, NordGen and governments of the Nordic countries, which have decided to continue funding the project. It is vitally important to continue this work because plant breeding is a long term process. There is no finishing line – only the way forward.

    Promoting Nordic Plant Breeding for the Future PPP Public Private Partnership for Pre-breeding
  • Rapport

    More than just weeds: NordGen's work with Cultural Relict Plants and Bernt Løjtnant's inventories from Denmark

    The report is about cultural relict plants – which are remaining populations of plants once introduced or cultivation and used as food, spice and medicine, fibres, colours, or other purposes. Such plants are often regarded as weeds, but they are rather part of a biocultural heritage. Some plants can be part of a place’s history and identity. The main part of the report is given to Bernt Løjtnant’s list of species and the inventories he has done on 100 Danish medieval locations as well as a red list of cultural relict plants in Denmark (in Danish text). The report also includes chapters on relict plants in other Nordic regions and NordGen’s collection missions and conservation efforts as well as a discussion of challenges and future perspectives related to conservation of such plants.

    More than just weeds: NordGen's work with Cultural Relict Plants and Bernt Løjtnant's inventories from Denmark
  • Rapport

    Kulturreliktväxter: Levande fornminnen och hur vi bevarar dem

    "Kulturreliktväxter – Levande fornminnen och hur vi bevarar dem" handlar om kulturreliktväxter i Norden. Skriften består av två delar. Den första handlar om vad kulturreliktväxter är och varför de är intressanta och viktiga att bevara. Den andra delen - Skötsel av områden där det kan finnas kulturreliktväxter - är en skötselhandledning, som genom praktiska tips och råd berättar hur man på ganska enkla sätt kan anpassa skötseln av en plats s. att reliktväxter kan få möjlighet att överleva och trivas där.

    Kulturreliktväxter: Levande fornminnen och hur vi bevarar dem
  • Rapport

    Sorter av köksväxter: Svenska priskuranter från 1800-talet till 1930

    Det finns idag ingen fullständig förteckning över sorter av köksväxter som odlats i Sverige samt vilka sorter som kan räknas som svenska. För att få svar på detta genomfördes 2012 och 2014 ett projekt med mål att få en förteckning på sorter av köksväxter som odlats i Sverige. Avsikter var också att ta reda på när de började säljas och när de försvann från marknadensamt om dessa sorter idag går att få tag på i genbank eller hos odlare. Beskrivning av sorterna var också önskvärt att få fram för att kunna skilja sorterna åt och, ifall de finns kvar, kunna utnyttja deras egenskaper, både i sin nuvarande form och i en framtida förädling. Tiden begränsades från 1800-talet fram till 1900-talets början. Den ursprungliga målsättningen att få en fullständig förteckning på sorter av köksväxter som odlats i Sverige från 1800-talet och framåt visade sig vara omöjligt. Det blev en förteckning (bilaga 2) men den har flera brister. Omfattningen av materialet bidrog till detta men ännu mer att det inte fanns en standardisering för sortnamn och sortbegrepp. Tonvikten i undersökningen skulle ligga på svenska sorter, vilket var ännu svårare eftersom det inte går att avgöra när en sort är svensk. Tydligt svenska sortnamn saknades nästan helt på 1800-talet men blev mer vanligt i början på 1900-talet. Det går också att konstatera att det var förvånansvärt många sorter som fortsätter att hänga med från mitten av 1800-talet till 1930.

    Sorter av köksväxter: Svenska priskuranter från 1800-talet till 1930
  • Tidskrift

    Nordic GENEresources

    A New NordGen Provides New Possibilities!
    Old Pastures & Old Livestock Breeds: A Perfect Match?
    Svalbard Global Seed Vault – Symbol and Reality
    Hidden Treasure – 2008 is the International Year of the Potato
    A ’Danish Giant’ Asparagus
    Climate Change – A Challenge for Plants!
    Nordic Cooperation on Genetic Resources under Sweden's Chair of the Nordic Council of Ministers in 2008
    The Finnhorse – A Versatile All-rounder
    Norwegian Red (NRF) – Enjoying International Success
    Contingency Flocks for Poultry
    Swedish National Action Plan for the Management of Farm Animal Genetic Resources
    The Icelandic Leadersheep
    Spruce Memory Enables Rapid Adaptation to Climate Change
    Special Tree Forms – A Poorly Utilised Forest Genetic Resource genresurs i våra skogar

  • Rapport

    Management and Exchange of Animal Genetic Resources – Nordic perspective

    This report is based on a project "Legal framework for the rights and exchange of animal genetic resources in the Nordic region" which was funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers and Norwegian Genetic Resource Center and Nordic Gene Bank for Farm Animals (now part of NordGen). The project delivers this report concerning the stakeholders' needs for legal framework and possibilities to assess the value of sales and exchange of genetic material of farm animals in the Nordic region. The project also analysed possible needs for framework and regulations related to animal breeding and animal genetic resources in a global context.

    Management and Exchange of Animal Genetic  Resources – Nordic perspective
  • Rapport

    Access and Rights to Genetic Resources

    The Report addresses various aspects related to rights and access to genetic resources in the Nordic countries. The report examines all genetic resources, while pointing out relevant differences between types of resources. The report studies the rights and access to the genetic resources managed by the Nordic Gene Bank. It also provides recommendations and alternatives for rights and access to genetic resources within the Nordic countries. It gives an overview of the need for and means of implementing the provisions of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITGRFA) and other international agreements in the Nordic countries. The report further analyses how rights and access to genetic resources relate to international law on intellectual property rights applied to genes and living organisms.

    Access and Rights to Genetic Resources